My 2015 In Books

So, here I am, with a hoarse throat and the cold rendering my feet useless. I look at the date and wonder why the hell I haven’t written a single post in 2016 yet. There is so much to talk about. So may things have happened in the past three weeks I must have lost track.

I am simply in love with Goodreads. It doesn’t just help you find books you might like, it helps you keep track of how big your to-read pile actually is (of course, it all depends on whether you know how thick each book is and if you’re actually even including every books that intrigues you). And best of all, it gives you a “Year in Books” page, where they put together your reading stats from all year round, provided that you document your reads to the best of your abilities.

If you take the Reading Challenge, all the better, because you can see what percentage of the challenge you’ve accomplished.

But, of course, if you use Goodreads you know all that. Or some of it, at least.

Last year, your’s truly read 31 books. I know it’s not much. I’ve read more the year before, I think. But, considering how all my batch-mates were wallowing in worry about their exams and didn’t even have time for naps, I’m sort of proud of that number.

Here’s the complete list, in no particular order:

  • The Old Man and the Sea  by Ernest Hemingway
  • Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand
  • Dune by Frank Herbert
  • To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee
  • Go Set A Watchman by Harper Lee
  • Use Your Head by Tony Buzan
  • Winter by Marissa Meyer
  • The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini
  • And The Mountains Echoed by Khaled Hosseini
  • A Thousand Splendid Suns by Khaled Hosseini
  • Fairest by Marissa Meyer
  • Isla and the Happily Ever After by Stephenie Perkins
  • The Bad Beginning by Lemony Snicket
  • The Reptile Room by Lemony Snicket
  • The Alchemist by Paolo Cuelho
  • The Catcher In The Rye by J.D. Salinger
  • 5 to 1 by Holly Bodger
  • The 39 Clues: The Maze of Bones by Rick Riordan
  • The 39 Clues: One False Note by Gordon Korman
  • The 39 Clues: Sword Thief by Peter Lerangis
  • The 39 Clues: Beyond The Grave by Jude Watson
  • The 39 Clues: The Black Circle by Patrick Carman
  • The 39 Clues: In Too Deep by Jude Watson
  • The 39 Clues: The Vipers Nest by Peter Lerangis
  • The 39 Clues: The Emperor’s Code by Gordon Korman
  • The 39 Clues: Storm Warning by Linda Sue Park
  • The 39 Clues: Into The Gauntlet by Margaret Peterson Haddix
  • The 39 Clues: Vespers Rising by Rick Riordan
  • The 39 Clues: Cahills vs Vespers: The Medusa Plot by Gordon Korman
  • The 39 Clues: Cahills vs Vespers: The King’s Ransom by Jude Watson
  • The 39 Clues: Cahills vs Vespers: The Dead of Night by Peter Lerangis

I read the 39 Clues series in that order, of course. All these books left different feelings with me in the end. Some had me grinning like an idiot. Some left me reeling. Some, I even regretting reading in the long run.

For instance, I remember really liking Atlas Shrugged right after finishing it, but it taxed my neural synapses and caused the worst case of writers’ block I experienced.

The 39 Clues series, on the other hand, is basically aimed for kids between the ages of 12-15. I’m going to be 18 this year, and I still love them.

I only read two books that came out last year. Namely, Winter by Marissa Meyer and Go Set A Watchman by Harper Lee. Also, only one non-fiction book was given the chance. The longest books was Atlas Shrugged (eloquent drunkard, according to the many single-star reviews), and the shortest was The Old Man and the Sea. Mockingbird was the most popular and Use Your Head the least. And last but not the least, the book that recieved the highest rating was Winter.

This list os going to be added as a seperate page under the My Reads page. And this year, I vow to review all the books listed in the pages this year. In Sha Allah.

On a side-note, I finished reading the Cahills vs Vespers series by the 21st of this month, and am currently plowing through the pages of Dickens’ A Tale of Two Cities. If you’ve got books you think I should read and/or have read some of the ones I’ve read, do share your thoughts in the comments below!

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Author: anankhan98

When I close my eyes, I see myself as a writer. I see a pale blank page in front of me and feel a solid pen in my hand. I feel inspiration flowing through me, hear the words being whispered in my ears, ready to be written. And I see myself writing them. So, I write. And that is why I am here right now. To let the world know that I want to become better at this. That there is this unbelievably naive living in this corner of the world, who wants to have people help her become the best she can become. My focus is actually on fiction. I dream up stories in my sleep, literally. And I can't help but want to write them. Knowing English only as a second language is a drawback, though. I still try.

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