Why I’ll never read Ayn Rand again

The size of the book was enormous. It was really wordy, and it was almost as long as all the LOTR books combined. I didn’t regret it when I read it. It was really fluent and felt really true, and the values presented just seemed so right.

I wrote a LOT about Atlas Shrugged after I read it sometime around May-June-July last year. Ayn Rand wrote well. At that time, I didn’t understand all the 1-2 start reviews it got on Goodreads, because I could honestly relate to it a lot. The way she portrayed the Immovable Movers, and the leaches might or might not have been realistic, but it sent shills down my spine. It was creepy to think about what went on inside all the hotshot business people’s (the ones who just leach off of the real producers) heads. The protagonists also presented this trend of only being attracted to people who understood them, and I respected that.

Apart from that, even the protagonists didn’t have that many virtues that I was drawn to. Yes, it is because of my Faith. I don’t approve of affairs and relationships outside of marriage.

I knew that I shouldn’t be taking a side so early, that I should’ve taken some time to think about it. As the months rolled by I found out more about Ayn Rand, and it makes sense that she would try to portray humans as the best of the best. She was an atheist, and she gave rise to a whole group of people who believe that it’s okay to let the country starve as long as you teach them they they can’t live without you.

Now, I agree with a lot of the reviews that said, “…reading this was like talking to a drunkard, but a fluent one…”. Yes, I concede that some people don’t deserve to be helped, because they don’t want improvement.

Ayn Rand believed that a human being lives only for him/herself. I would not suggest this book to anyone at this point. There is some truth, in the way some people expect others to give in everything but don’t contribute nearly as much. I’ve seen people like that all around me. But there are other ways to realize this.

The biggest problem I had after Atlas shrugged was that I felt that writing a character’s specific physical and emotional feelings together was the only way to get anything to work, and it did work for a bit. Then, it just went out of control. When I realized that, it felt like my brain was in mush.

Nothing like what she did in the novel ever happened, and it will ever happen. It’s just too unrealistic. You’ll be feeling euphoric when and after you read her, but if you’re anything like me, it’ll just leave a bitter taste in your mouth on the long run.

I’m never reading Ayn Rand again.

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Author: anankhan98

When I close my eyes, I see myself as a writer. I see a pale blank page in front of me and feel a solid pen in my hand. I feel inspiration flowing through me, hear the words being whispered in my ears, ready to be written. And I see myself writing them. So, I write. And that is why I am here right now. To let the world know that I want to become better at this. That there is this unbelievably naive living in this corner of the world, who wants to have people help her become the best she can become. My focus is actually on fiction. I dream up stories in my sleep, literally. And I can't help but want to write them. Knowing English only as a second language is a drawback, though. I still try.

4 thoughts on “Why I’ll never read Ayn Rand again”

    1. Funnily enough, I thought it was a guy too when I started reading. And then I started doing searches midway, especially for fanfiction (:p). The name sounds like a guy’s doesn’t it?

      Like

  1. I had started The Early Ayn Rand – a collection of her initial smaller stories, but did not like it too much! Also, I find this with a lot of famous authors – I don’t end up liking them as much as I think after hearing all the hype about it. And I think it is okay. Just like writers are different, readers are too.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. The thing with Ayn Rand is that she makes everything appear so right in the way she wants us to see the world. While that proves that she’s a great novelist, the ideals presented make me cringe.

      Liked by 1 person

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